Sabine Flitsch

Professor of Biological Chemistry

Sabine Flitsch

We are proud of our Athena Swan award as a recognition of our efforts to ensure that all of our students can achieve their scientific potential irrespective of their gender or backgrounds. 

 

How would you summarise your research to undergraduates?

My research interests are at the interface of chemistry and biology with focus on synthesis and biotechnology, particularly in the areas of biocatalysis and glycoscience.

How would you summarise your research to postgraduates?

We are concerned with applications of biological oxidation to organic synthesis, in particular using P450 monooxygases and sugar oxidases. Secondly, we are interested in using biocatalysis for the synthesis of complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates such as glycolipids, glycoproteins, polysaccharides and glycomaterials.

My group has developed a broad toolset in these areas ranging from chemical synthesis and physical analytical techniques to protein chemistry and biochemistry with the aim to develop fast, effective and environmentally friendly biocatalysts for applications in diverse industries.

What do you think makes the School distinctive?

We are proud of our Athena Swan award as a recognition of our efforts to ensure that all of our students can achieve their scientific potential irrespective of their gender or backgrounds. 

The School embraces a multidisciplinary approach allowing students to appreciate the breadth of opportunities for chemists in modern science.

What do you enjoy most about teaching?

In my capacity as a Professor of Biological Chemistry I am able to convey some of the excitement and fulfilment of biological chemistry and ensure that our students receive a modern, exciting and relevant course.

How do you make your teaching up-to-date, innovative and inspirational?

Through my research to understand the human glycome, I collaborate with world leading scientists at the interface between chemistry and biology. 

My role on academic research panels and on several industrial advisory boards helps to maintain the relevance of our teaching and research activities.

What do you enjoy most about research?

My research in the area of glycoscience can help to open the doors to personalised medicine and has the potential to generate an entirely new generation of renewable biomaterials,  improving the lives of generations to come.

How long have you been at the School?

I have now been at Manchester for almost 10 years.  I have previously worked  at some of the world's most prestigious Universities which has allowed me to appreciate that the University of Manchester is truly a world leading institution.

When a student completes their course, what for you are the measures of success?

I hope that all of our students fulfil their personal ambitions:  If this is to continue to pursue a scientific research career, then it is our responsibility to provide encouragement and opportunity for them to do so.

How do you think students describe or remember you?

As a world leading scientist who has provided inspiration and opportunity for a new generation of students to appreciate the chemical wonders in biology.

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