Roger Whitehead

Roger Whitehead

A major benefit is that Chemistry with Medicinal Chemistry [MChem] is a brand new, 'bespoke' course with material presented by experts from a variety of areas – Schools of Chemistry and Pharmacy, AstraZeneca, The Paterson Institute and the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

 

How do you make sure that the course is up-to-date and relevant?

This is a brand new course of which the first year 'rolled out' last year and the coming year will see the first second year material being given. The course has been designed by members of the School of Chemistry and the School of Pharmacy with input from employees of AstraZeneca and the Paterson Institute. By its very nature, therefore, it is an up to date course.

20 credits each year are made up of medicinal chemistry units and the remainder of the course is common with the single honours course.

What kind of balance do you strike between teaching facts and developing skills?

The pharmacy-related topics are generally more fact based, whereas the chemistry-related topics generally involve more problem-solving and creativity.

How does research feed into the syllabus?

Many of the lectures on the course are actively involved in research in the medicinal chemistry area and this, naturally, has an influence on the flavour of the taught courses – particularly those in the later years of the course

What structure does your course have?

As mentioned above, the course comprises 120 credits each year, 100 of which are common with the single honours courses and 20 of which cover specific aspects of modern medicinal chemistry.

The medicinal chemistry lectures are given jointly by members of the School of Chemistry and the School of Pharmacy, and also include contributions from employees of AstraZeneca, the Paterson Institute and the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

The practical component of the course is common with the straight honours courses and includes a group project in Year 3 with a medicinal chemistry flavour as well as the opportunity to carry out an independent research project in the same area in Year 4.

What are the key features of your course?

An excellent core training in all aspects of chemistry (theory and practical) topped up with a very sound training in many areas of modern medicinal chemistry.

What kind of employment can graduates go into following this degree?

Almost any employment requiring a good scientific training. The training in medicinal chemistry is particularly useful for those who may wish to work in the pharmaceutical industry or continue academic research in more biological fields.

Why do graduates from your course stand out in the job market?

Excellent scientific training (both theory and practical) in a cross-disciplinary subject area – the ability to embrace two different subject areas which have quite different learning requirements and great potential application in many areas of life today.

What kind of industry relations do you have?

Strong links with AstraZeneca, who contribute to the Medicinal Chemistry modules, as well as the core Chemistry modules. Similar links with the Paterson Institute who will contribute to the Medicinal Chemistry modules.

Students benefit by being made aware of both the academic as well as industrial aspects of this cross-disciplinary subject.

What distinguishes this course from similar ones in other institutions?

The major benefits are that it is a brand new, 'bespoke' course with material presented by experts from a variety of areas – Schools of Chemistry and Pharmacy, AstraZeneca, The Paterson Institute and the Manchester Royal Infirmary.

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