ERC Consolidator Success: Dr Casiraghi and Dr Layfield

The School of Chemistry has been successfully awarded two prestigious ERC Consolidator Grants. Congratulations to Dr Cinzia Casiraghi and Dr Richard Layfield.

Dr Casiraghi’s project is titled “NOC2D”. The formation of crystalline solids from liquid-phase precursor is a central idea in materials chemistry. Organic crystal structures can be found in a large number of products, including food, explosives, pigments and pharmaceuticals. Control of molecular assembly is therefore a fundamental problem for both research and industry and it involves substantial scientific and economic challenges. Therefore, it is essential to achieve a deep understanding on the molecular processes happening at the early stage of crystallization. The aim of this proposal is to use 2D crystals to open new horizons in the understanding of nucleation of organic crystals by using a multi-disciplinary approach, which combines chemical engineering, material chemistry, graphene physics and sensors technology. Our approach will allow us to probe rare nucleation events with nanoscale resolution and very high sensitivity, providing direct insights on the structure of the nuclei and their interaction with the environment.

Dr Layfield’s project “RadMag” will develop a new generation of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) based on lanthanide organometallics coupled to unusual main group radical species. The main focus will be on understanding the electronic structure of the SMMs, using a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches, and on how new synthetic approaches can be manipulated to enable magnetic hysteresis at much higher temperatures than in the current state-of-the-art SMMs.

The School of Chemistry has been successfully awarded two prestigious ERC Consolidator Grants. Congratulations to Dr Cinzia Casiraghi and Dr Richard Layfield.
Dr Casiraghi’s project is titled “NOC2D”. The formation of crystalline solids from liquid-phase precursor is a central idea in materials chemistry. Organic crystal structures can be found in a large number of products, including food, explosives, pigments and pharmaceuticals. Control of molecular assembly is therefore a fundamental problem for both research and industry and it involves substantial scientific and economic challenges. Therefore, it is essential to achieve a deep understanding on the molecular processes happening at the early stage of crystallization.  The aim of this proposal is to use 2D crystals to open new horizons in the understanding of nucleation of organic crystals by using a multi-disciplinary approach, which combines chemical engineering, material chemistry, graphene physics and sensors technology. Our approach will allow us to probe rare nucleation events with nanoscale resolution and very high sensitivity, providing direct insights on the structure of the nuclei and their interaction with the environment.
Dr Layfield’s project “RadMag” will develop a new generation of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) based on lanthanide organometallics coupled to unusual main group radical species. The main focus will be on understanding the electronic structure of the SMMs, using a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches, and on how new synthetic approaches can be manipulated to enable magnetic hysteresis at much higher temperatures than in the current state-of-the-art SMMs.

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